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Follow The Twitter Feed

Hey folks, the blog may be on temporary hiatus, but you can get your daily dose of Space News and History at http://twitter.com/newsfromspace - follow @newsfromspace. The feed in the right-hand column is broken (only shows tweets up to Oct 10) but rest assured we are still alive!

Site updates are in the works (including fixing that pesky Twitter feed). Stay tuned...

STS-135: Launch Friday?

Atlantis will lift off Friday morning at 11:26AM EDT on her final flight, the last one of the Shuttle program. Weather is a concern for liftoff. Follow us on Twitter for live updates! NASA image of STS-135 patch

Live HD coverage at SpaceVidCast. Live video at SFN and Florida Today. Launch blog at NASA. Pics and video at KSC. More clips at Space Multimedia, and right here. Live comms from Pad 39A here. Check the links at right for play-by-play and NASA TV.

STS-134: Landing Early Wed Morning

Endeavour will land for the last time at 2:35AM EDT Wednesday 1 June 2010. Follow us on Twitter for live updates!

Live HD coverage at SpaceVidCast. Live video at SFN and Florida Today. Landing blog at NASA. Pics and video at KSC. More clips at Space Multimedia. Check the links at right for play-by-play and NASA TV.

STS-134: Launch Monday

Endeavour will lift off Monday morning at 8:56AM EDT on her final flight. Follow us on Twitter for live updates! NASA image of STS-134 patch

Live HD coverage at SpaceVidCast. Live video at SFN and Florida Today. Launch blog at NASA. Pics and video at KSC. More clips at Space Multimedia. Check the links at right for play-by-play and NASA TV.

STS-133: TOUCHDOWN!

"And Houston, Discovery. For the final time, wheelstop."

Discovery made her last landing this morning, wrapping up her final mission to the International Space Station. Touchdown occurred right on time,  just before noon EST (1657 UT). Sadly, her next destination - after accruing 365 days in space - will be a museum. NASA reports:

Discovery Lands in Florida to Complete STS-133!

Discovery rolls down the runway after landing Image above: Space shuttle Discovery touches down at the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Wednesday, March 9, to end the STS-133 mission. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls
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At 11:57 a.m. EST, Space shuttle Discovery landed for the final time at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center after 202 orbits around Earth and a journey of 5,304,140 miles on STS-133. Discovery’s main gear touched down at 11:57:17 a.m. followed by the nose gear at 11:57:28 and wheels stop at 11:58:14 a.m. At wheels stop, the mission elapsed time was 12 days, 19 hours, four minutes and 50 seconds. STS-133 was the 39th and final flight for Discovery, which spent 365 days in space, orbited Earth 5,830 times and traveled 148,221,675 miles.


Space Shuttle Mission: STS-133

The crew of STS-133. Image above: The crew of space shuttle Discovery's STS-133 mission, the final flight for NASA's oldest active shuttle. The astronauts are, from left, Mission Specialists Nicole Stott and Michael Barratt, Pilot Eric Boe, Commander Steve Lindsey and Mission Specialists Alvin Drew and Steve Bowen. Image credit: NASA TV
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During space shuttle Discovery's final spaceflight, the STS-133 crew members delivered important spare parts to the International Space Station along with the Express Logistics Carrier-4.

Steve Bowen replaced Tim Kopra as Mission Specialist 2 following a bicycle injury on Jan. 15 that prohibited Kopra from supporting the launch window. Bowen last flew on Atlantis in May 2010 as part of the STS-132 crew. Flying on the STS-133 mission makes Bowen the first astronaut ever to fly on consecutive missions.

Mission Stats

STS-133 Mission Statistics

Landed:
Wed., March 9, 2011, 11:47 a.m. EST

Landing Site:
Kennedy Space Center, Florida

Mission Elapsed Time
12 days, 19 hours, 3 minutes, 53 seconds

Official Landing Times
Main gear touchdown: 11:57:17 a.m. EST
Nose gear touchdown: 11:57:28 a.m. EST
Wheels stop: 11:58:14 a.m. EST
Total miles: more than 5.3 million

Additional STS-133 Resources
› Countdown highlights
› Launch Week Events
› STS-133 Press Kit (11.4 Mb PDF)
› STS-133 Mission Summary (778 Kb PDF)
› STS-133 Crew
› Discovery facts (351 Kb PDF)
› Discovery's Career in Photos
› Discovery Retrospective
› Tanking Test Details (Dec. 17, 2010)

› Orbiter Status Updates

Live HD coverage at SpaceVidCast. Live video at SFN and Florida Today. Discussion at Nasaspaceflight. Landing blog at NASA. Pics and video at KSC. More clips at Space Multimedia. Check the links at right for play-by-play and NASA TV. Follow us on Twitter!

STS-133: Landing Day

Today will see the last-ever landing day for Shuttle Discovery (barring any weather-related wave-offs). Weather conditions at KSC are looking good, with winds being the only concern. Edwards has not been called up for today's landing attempts. Touchdown is scheduled for just before noon EST (1657 UT). NASA reports:

Crew Preps for Today's Landing

STS-133 Landing Track

After flying a flawless mission in space, space shuttle Discovery and its six astronauts are getting ready for their return to Earth. Landing is scheduled for 11:57 a.m. EST at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Landing Day Highlights (All times EST)
6:53 a.m. Deorbit Prep begins
8:12 a.m. Payload Bay Doors Closing
8:22 a.m. Mission Control: “Go” for Ops 3 Transition
9:29 a.m. Clothing Configuration
9:52 a.m. Seat Ingress
10:19 a.m. OMS Gimbal Check
10:30 a.m. Auxiliary Power Unit Prestart
10:42 a.m. MCC “Go-No Go” Decision for the Deorbit Burn
10:47 a.m. Maneuver to the Deorbit Burn Attitude
10:52 a.m. Deorbit Burn
11:44 a.m. Merritt Island, Fla., tracking station Acquisition of Signal from Discovery
11:57 a.m. Landing at Kennedy Space Center

Additional STS-133 Resources
› Countdown highlights
› Launch Week Events
› STS-133 Press Kit (11.4 Mb PDF)
› STS-133 Mission Summary (778 Kb PDF)
› STS-133 Crew
› Discovery facts (351 Kb PDF)
› Discovery's Career in Photos
› Discovery Retrospective
› Tanking Test Details (Dec. 17, 2010)

Live HD coverage at SpaceVidCast. Live video at SFN and Florida Today. Discussion at Nasaspaceflight. Landing blog at NASA. Pics and video at KSC. More clips at Space Multimedia. Check the links at right for play-by-play and NASA TV. Follow us on Twitter!

STS-133: Launch Day 3

Today is the third launch attempt for Shuttle Discovery, on her last flight ever. Weather conditions are 80%-90% Go, and the Shuttle is fueled up for this afternoon's liftoff. NASA reports:

Launch Day for Discovery

Discovery on the launch pad.
Image above: Space shuttle Discovery stands on the launch pad Thursday morning for liftoff. A crawler-transporter is carrying the shuttle stack. Photo credit: NASA TV
› Larger image

Space shuttle Discovery is scheduled to begin an 11-day mission to the International Space Station with a launch at 4:50 p.m. EST today from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The STS-133 mission is Discovery's final scheduled flight.

The six astronauts for the mission will deliver the Permanent Multipurpose Module, or PMM, to the station. The PMM was converted from the multi-purpose logistics module Leonardo and will provide additional storage for the station crew. Experiments in such fields as fluid physics, materials science, biology and biotechnology may be conducted inside the module.

Today's Countdown Highlights

10:25 a.m. Countdown enters a 2-hour, 30-minute built-in hold at the T-3 hour mark; fueling is complete and goes into stable replenish
10:55 a.m. Astronauts have a photo opportunity in crew quarters (not broadcast on NASA TV)
11:00 a.m. The Ascent Team of flight controllers is on console in Mission Control, Houston
11:30 a.m. NASA TV LAUNCH COVERAGE BEGINS
12:20 p.m. The astronauts conduct a weather briefing with Flight Director Richard Jones and the Ascent Team of flight controllers in Mission Control, Houston
12:30 p.m. The astronauts suit up for launch
12:55 p.m. Countdown resumes at the T-3 hour mark
1:00 p.m. The astronauts depart their crew quarters for Launch Pad 39-A
1:30 p.m. The astronauts arrive at Launch Pad 39-A and begin to board Discovery
2:45 p.m. Discovery’s hatch is closed and latched for launch
3:35 p.m. Countdown enters a 10-minute built-in hold at the T-20 minute mark
3:45 p.m. Countdown resumes at the T-20 minute mark
3:56 p.m. Countdown enters a 40-minute built-in hold at the T-9 minute mark; the MMT conducts its final poll for a “go-no go” for the launch of Discovery (This hold will be adjusted by about 5 additional minutes to become a 45-minute built-in hold designed to meet the preferred in-plane launch time of 4:50:19pm EST)
4:41 p.m. Countdown resumes at the T-9 minute mark
4:45 p.m. APU start
4:50:19pm LAUNCH OF DISCOVERY ON THE STS-133 MISSION
4:58:49 p.m. Main Engine Cut-Off

Additional STS-133 Resources
› Countdown highlights
› Launch Week Events
› STS-133 Press Kit (11.4 Mb PDF)
› STS-133 Mission Summary (778 Kb PDF)
› STS-133 Crew
› Discovery facts (351 Kb PDF)
› Discovery's Career in Photos
› Discovery Retrospective
› Tanking Test Details (Dec. 17, 2010)

› Orbiter Status Updates

Live HD coverage at SpaceVidCast. Live video at SFN and Florida Today. Discussion at Nasaspaceflight. Preflight pics are up at JSC and Sentinel. Launch blog at NASA. Pics and video at KSC. More clips at Space Multimedia. Check the links at right for play-by-play and NASA TV.

What Made 400 People Volunteer for a One-Way Mission to Mars?

An interplanetary trip to Mars could take as little as 10 months, but returning would be virtually impossible -- making the voyage a form of self-imposed exile from Earth unlike anything else in human history.

http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2011/01/10/space-volunteer-way-mission-mars/?test=latestnews

marsplanet

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